Why We Talk About Sex So Much

As most of you parents know, the message last week at our High Voltage service was about sex. After service, I sent the students home a pretty thick packet of information… about sex. Thursday night at Pause, again the topic was sex. Why so much emphasis on sex? Teenagers know to wait, right?

A couple of days ago I ran across an article on MSN’s (Microsoft’s) front page, an editorial piece titled “In Defense of Losing Your Virginity”. This article pretty much contradicted everything I had taught the youth the week before.

The article was written in response to an incident at the MTV Video Music Awards. A good portion of the host’s comedic material centered on the Jonas Brothers’ public stance on sexual purity. All three of these pastor’s kids wear a promise ring and have vowed to remain celibate until marriage. The author of this article believes that the host was right to challenge the boy’s decision, calling their purity rings a “sham” and stating that saving sex is not only an unreasonable expectation, but that it is actually a harmful idea. Unbelievably, the author asserts that abstaining from sex puts teens at an increased risk of getting pregnant or contracting a sexually transmitted disease.

“Plenty of studies have shown that promoting abstinence fails, and that teens who try this route are less likely to use contraception, making them more likely to become pregnant or infected with preventable sexually transmitted diseases.”

Additionally, the author insists that even if a person is successful in saving sex for marriage, they are more likely to end up in a bad marriage than their sexually active peers.

“But the idea of saving it for marriage is only so useful, and it’s the sort of thing that will no doubt lead to starter marriages between horny 18-year-olds who don’t have any idea what “till death do you part” really means.”

Even worse than the article were the comments that readers left. While some did stand up for those who choose to remain sexually pure, many others applauded the author for telling the “truth” and continued to mock those students who wait.

This article was featured prominently on the front page on MSN.com, not on some obscure blog that few will ever read. Teenagers are getting messages about sex everyday, some subtle, some very direct. It’s is imperative that the we present them with a different vision than the world’s. I say “we” because this has to be a joint effort of parents and the church to teach our children and youth the truth about sex in a world gone sexually mad. Teenagers need to know why waiting is so important, so that when they face temptation, they have something stronger to fall back on than “My dad/mom/youth pastor said it’s wrong.” The world believes that teenagers are going to have sex and that there’s nothing that can be done to stop them. We must challenge that message and show our teens that there is a better way.